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20120925
20121003
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
% of the u.n.'s operating budget. the next closest, japan, pays 12.5%. most nations pay 0.01%. what are we getting for that money? no, really? what are we getting? but back to me, of course. traffic was a bear this morning. so i think the u.n. would be better served somewhere else. i'm sure another struggling nation would love to make some money off the well-heeled diplomats who inhabit the building and tbut like high maintenance wife who is all take and no give, i think it's clear the as you know more trouble than it's worth. that does it for "the cycle." it's all yours. >> sarah elizabeth, you might have considered walking if you were stuck in a cab for an hour. >> i should have. >> it's tuesday, september 25th, and it's presidents and prime ministers at the crossroads of the world. >>> serious issues demand serious leadership. >> let me be clear, america wants to resolve this issue through diplomacy, and we believe that there is still time and space to do so. that time is not unlimited. >> leaders who will stand up against tyranny. >> the iranian government continues to prop up a dictat
is calling on the u.n. ambassador to the united nations, susan rice, to resign for initially calling the attack, quote, spontaneous and not premeditated. >> she could have said it's uncertain as to exactly how it was done, it's unsure how it was done. but to rule out terrorism saying it was not a terrorist, that was wrong. she misled the people, either if it was unintentionally or done out of ignorance. in either case, she would do the right thing and step down and resign. >> yesterday the spokesman for the national intelligence director issued a statement saying they, "revised our initial assessment to reflect new information indicating that it was a deliberate and organized terrorist attack carried out extremists." brent colburn is the national communications director for the obama campaign. brent, good saturday to you. >> thanks for having me, craig. >> "the new york times" today has a piece. the piece is called "shifting reports on libya killings may cost obama." how concerned are you at this point about the way the white house has explained the attack on the embassy? >> sure. we
of u.n. ambassador susan rice because of her handling of the u.s. consulate attack in benghazi. u.s. intelligence is saying there is evidence that the attack was initially planned. initially, the administration had maintained they believed the attacks in libya were spontaneous reaction to the offensive video that rocked the middle east and beyond. could the direct sort of politicizing of the benghazi attack snowball into a full-blown october surprise for the president? what do you think? does the changing discourse about what happened in benghazi ultimately cause harm to the president? >> the thing about an october surprise is it usually has to reinforce some fundamental weakness or arguments from taking place with the president. if you think about the bin laden tape at the end of the 2004 campaign with bush and kerry, bush had been running on this fear and strength and all these issues getting the country animated on this. by the time the surprise happened, it reinforced what the people already believed. the thing that the president and this is why the bin laden assassination sor
a republican and democrat agreeing on much besides that this week. and for the worst week, it's u.n. ambassador to the united nations, susan ryce. he was either not included in some of these briefings, which would be troublesome, or just thrown under the bus when she went out on the sunday shows, explaining that this was not a planned attack, and we now know it was a terrorist attack in libya. >> do you think anything's going to happen with that, with susan rice? do you think she could potentially lose her job or no? >> i don't think she'll lose her job, but i don't think we'll be seeing her much in the upcoming months. >> molly, best and worst? >> i'll give best week to todd akin, the republican senate candidate out in missouri. the deadline passed this week for him to withdraw from the race. he was under heavy, heavy pressure from so many republicans to get out. they say they couldn't possibly win. he stuck it out, he knew they'd come around and they'd give him their money and their support when they didn't have a choice, and sure enough, that's exactly what's happening. you have a lot of rep
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)